7 SURPRISING FASHION FACTS YOU PROBABLY DIDN’T KNOW

Writer:fashion Date:2017-9-2 11:27 Saturday Categories:Other Brands

When it comes to fashion, trends come and go. From ancient times to now, the world of style and beauty has seen so many changes. Here, we take a look at some unusual footnotes fashion history. From designer rivalries to deadly trends and common misconceptions, discover seven crazy fashion facts below.

FLAPPERS DIDN’T WEAR FRINGE

Louise Brooks in flapper style.

When one thinks of style for the 1920’s, a common go-to is the fringe dress. But that is not so according to Beverley Birks,  an exhibition curator, who spoke to Racked in 2017.“Fringe [was] not the most common thing you saw in the 1920's. That would be beadwork or embroidery,” she reveals. As with many things, this can be tied back to Hollywood. Movies set in the 1920’s but made in the 1950’s took on modern interpretations of retro style. But nonetheless, the myth of flappers wearing fringe still persists to this day.

FOUNDATION WAS MADE WITH LEAD

Queen Elizabeth I portrait
Queen Elizabeth I portrait

Nowadays, consumers are more aware of toxic chemicals used in makeup products. But back in ancient times and up to the 19thcentury, lead-based powder was all the rage. Portraits of famous figures such as Queen Elizabeth I feature faces with pale, milky white skin. Many people used ceruse foundationwhich included white lead as the main ingredient to achieve this look.

Interestingly enough, Queen Elizabeth I used the foundation to cover scars which came from a bout of smallpox in her 20s. Lead poisoning can ultimately lead to death and takes years to take effect. Sufferers had a variety of symptoms such as insomnia, headaches, paralysis and ironically enough--skin blemishes.

COCO CHANEL AND ELSA SCHIAPARELLI HAD A BITTER FEUD

 (Left) Coco Chanel (Right) Elsa Schiaparelli
(Left) Coco Chanel (Right) Elsa Schiaparelli

Today, Chanel is one of fashion’s most famed names. But in the 1930’s, designers Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel and Elsa Schiaparelli were bitter rivals. Schiaparelli was known for making fashion forward designs compared to her peers. "Of course they were rivals, privately damning each other with faint praise. It is also claimed that Chanel once succeeded in setting Schiaparelli on fire,” Chanel and Schiaparelli biographers Rhonda K. Garelick and Meryle Secrest toldHarper’s Bazaar.

Chanel once referred to Schiaparelli as “that Italian artist who is making clothes.” After World War II, it was the house of Chanel which succeeded while Schiaparelli’s business went bankrupt and she closed it in 1954. In 2013, the Schiaparelli brand was officially relaunched under the creative direction of Marco Zanini.

Powered by bagfashionews.com | Fashion | Clothing | sitemap